Error loading page.
Try refreshing the page. If that doesn't work, there may be a network issue, and you can use our self test page to see what's preventing the page from loading.
Learn more about possible network issues or contact support for more help.

The Economist

Jun 26 2021
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

Coronavirus briefs • To 6am GMT Jun 24th 2021

The world this week

Still going strong • China’s ruling party is about to turn 100. How long can the world’s most successful autocracy last?

New horizons • Investors can no longer take low interest rates for granted

Must try harder • School closures have caused children great harm. Governments are doing shockingly little to help them catch up

Radically reasonable • Joe Manchin’s proposed changes to America’s voting laws deserve wide support

Know thyself • To understand human genetic diversity, study the place where humans first evolved

Letters

Catching up is hard to do • The pandemic has been a catastrophe for schoolchildren. But it could inspire reforms to make schools more efficient, flexible and fair

The 3-3-3 court • NEW YORK

Down and up • NEW YORK

Biden and the bishops • NEW YORK

Background noise • LOS ANGELES

Kelp wanted • BLOCK ISLAND

The Foreign Not-in-Service • NEW YORK

Banana Man loses his appeal • PORT-AU-PRINCE

Puffalo soldiers • Bob Marley’s heirs boost Jamaica’s ganja industry

Let them only speak French • MONTREAL

The monster of Managua • Daniel Ortega tears up all pretence of democracy in Nicaragua

The downward spiral • SINGAPORE

No more Mr Mice Guy • SYDNEY

Silenced witness • MANILA

Unlawfully wed • SINGAPORE

The book of Cho • A political memoir has South Koreans asking whom politicians serve

The stories we tell • SHIRAOI

Vanguard of the non-working class • HONG KONG

Brought to book • BEIJING

Farewell, Apple Daily

Hiding in plain sight • A trip to Xinjiang reveals the racial targeting of population-control measures

The African genome project • CAPE TOWN

Islands of democracy • Why Africa’s island states are freer

A bonfire of satire • ABUJA

A hardliner wins, democracy loses • What the election of Ebrahim Raisi means for Iran and the nuclear deal

Lingering fallout • The long legacy of France’s nuclear tests in Algeria

Another slap in the face • PARIS

The nine lives of Lofven • A fallen PM gets a last chance

Muck in Marmara • ISTANBUL

Pardoning the separatists • MADRID

Crimea and punishment • Russian and British forces square off in the Black Sea

Belgitude: the art of Belgian zen • A rogue soldier explains life in Europe’s strangest country

How to spend it • Procurement reforms offer a glimpse of Britain after Brexit

A Unionist Pootsch • BELFAST

Growing pains • The government says it wants an economic boom. Its core voters are less keen

Flying blind • Covid-19 has stymied governments’ efforts to collect data. But it may also spur innovation

Rocks and hard places • Big miners are showing uncharacteristic discipline amid soaring metals prices. That could be bad news for the climate

Grid luck • NEW YORK

Selling like hot cakes • HONG KONG

Going solo • The world’s biggest record label heads for an IPO

Making short work of it • BERLIN

Machines and machinations • TOKYO

Workers on the march • Labour may be gaining ground on capital

A new Tiger in town • How a hyperactive technology fund is changing Silicon Valley

Euro...


Expand title description text

Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

Coronavirus briefs • To 6am GMT Jun 24th 2021

The world this week

Still going strong • China’s ruling party is about to turn 100. How long can the world’s most successful autocracy last?

New horizons • Investors can no longer take low interest rates for granted

Must try harder • School closures have caused children great harm. Governments are doing shockingly little to help them catch up

Radically reasonable • Joe Manchin’s proposed changes to America’s voting laws deserve wide support

Know thyself • To understand human genetic diversity, study the place where humans first evolved

Letters

Catching up is hard to do • The pandemic has been a catastrophe for schoolchildren. But it could inspire reforms to make schools more efficient, flexible and fair

The 3-3-3 court • NEW YORK

Down and up • NEW YORK

Biden and the bishops • NEW YORK

Background noise • LOS ANGELES

Kelp wanted • BLOCK ISLAND

The Foreign Not-in-Service • NEW YORK

Banana Man loses his appeal • PORT-AU-PRINCE

Puffalo soldiers • Bob Marley’s heirs boost Jamaica’s ganja industry

Let them only speak French • MONTREAL

The monster of Managua • Daniel Ortega tears up all pretence of democracy in Nicaragua

The downward spiral • SINGAPORE

No more Mr Mice Guy • SYDNEY

Silenced witness • MANILA

Unlawfully wed • SINGAPORE

The book of Cho • A political memoir has South Koreans asking whom politicians serve

The stories we tell • SHIRAOI

Vanguard of the non-working class • HONG KONG

Brought to book • BEIJING

Farewell, Apple Daily

Hiding in plain sight • A trip to Xinjiang reveals the racial targeting of population-control measures

The African genome project • CAPE TOWN

Islands of democracy • Why Africa’s island states are freer

A bonfire of satire • ABUJA

A hardliner wins, democracy loses • What the election of Ebrahim Raisi means for Iran and the nuclear deal

Lingering fallout • The long legacy of France’s nuclear tests in Algeria

Another slap in the face • PARIS

The nine lives of Lofven • A fallen PM gets a last chance

Muck in Marmara • ISTANBUL

Pardoning the separatists • MADRID

Crimea and punishment • Russian and British forces square off in the Black Sea

Belgitude: the art of Belgian zen • A rogue soldier explains life in Europe’s strangest country

How to spend it • Procurement reforms offer a glimpse of Britain after Brexit

A Unionist Pootsch • BELFAST

Growing pains • The government says it wants an economic boom. Its core voters are less keen

Flying blind • Covid-19 has stymied governments’ efforts to collect data. But it may also spur innovation

Rocks and hard places • Big miners are showing uncharacteristic discipline amid soaring metals prices. That could be bad news for the climate

Grid luck • NEW YORK

Selling like hot cakes • HONG KONG

Going solo • The world’s biggest record label heads for an IPO

Making short work of it • BERLIN

Machines and machinations • TOKYO

Workers on the march • Labour may be gaining ground on capital

A new Tiger in town • How a hyperactive technology fund is changing Silicon Valley

Euro...


Expand title description text