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The Economist

Feb 27 2021
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

Coronavirus briefs • To 6am GMT February 25th 2021

The world this week

The dust-up • A new phase in the global tech contest is under way

The battle for China’s backyard • The growing rivalry between America and China will hinge on South-East Asia

How to make sparks fly • Lessons from the pandemic on how to promote innovation

Fixing Africa’s pricey politics • Tackling patronage requires understanding how it works

Call of duty • It is time to close the airport-shopping loophole

Letters

Tea and tributaries • HONG KONG AND SINGAPORE

Nukes of hazard • America’s ICBMS are ageing. Does it still need them?

It contains multitudes • America struggles to comprehend the scale of its loss

Go big or go home • CHICAGO

To smooth a cliff • Smuggled into the covid-relief bill is an overdue fix for Obamacare

Stop writing • BOSTON

Snow business • DALLAS

Teach first • America’s failure to get millions of its children back to school is a national fiasco

Hoping against hope • The country needs a new leader. It is not clear when it will get one

Reggaeton rebellion • A music video rattles the regime

Victory for the old politics • The winding up of Brazil’s anti-corruption task-force marks the end of an era

Life in the doghouse • HONG KONG, SEOUL AND SYDNEY

Breaking cover • SINGAPORE

Get me a flat—or else • SEOUL

Toolmasters • The Indian government’s pursuit of its critics is not just unfair, but hypocritical

Time for some holistic love • HONG KONG

Reviled to revered • BEIJING

Build it and they will go • China’s high-speed trains enable long-distance commuting. Officials are not sure they approve

The gilded path to power • COTONOU, KAMPALA AND MAIKUU

Murder in the mountains • ADDIS ABABA

Abu Yair wants your support • JERUSALEM

The odd couple • ISTANBUL AND MOSCOW

Uphill struggle in the snow • SAINT-MARTIN-DE-BELLEVILLE

Secret snips • BERLIN

Underground abortions • After a ban in Poland, Polish women buy train tickets

How life sciences came to the rescue • A powerful research base combined with good decision-making to save lives

Pencil it in • The government learns to manage expectations

An impossible job • The prime minister’s lot is not a happy one

Kitchen-table classrooms • Covid-19 has persuaded some parents that home-schooling is better

Collusion and collisions • The new rules of competition in the technology industry

Loss of Sneadership

Continental drift • HONG KONG AND PARIS

Foot-in-mouth disease • How to avoid corporate embarrassment

Headsets at dawn • Apple’s duel with Facebook exemplifies a new form of big-power rivalry

Coming into its own • The price of carbon in the world’s biggest, most liquid market is soaring. Investors are starting to pay attention 

Cleaning up • HONG KONG AND SHANGHAI

Petrol problems  • SÃO PAULO

UnTethered • A stablecoin is branded anything but, adding to jitters in crypto-markets

Jumping the skew • A feted fund manager and the search for the big business winners of the future

Not having it all • WASHINGTON, DC

Giving up carbs • What are cheap ways to cut carbon? Bill Gates is the latest to ask the...


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Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

Coronavirus briefs • To 6am GMT February 25th 2021

The world this week

The dust-up • A new phase in the global tech contest is under way

The battle for China’s backyard • The growing rivalry between America and China will hinge on South-East Asia

How to make sparks fly • Lessons from the pandemic on how to promote innovation

Fixing Africa’s pricey politics • Tackling patronage requires understanding how it works

Call of duty • It is time to close the airport-shopping loophole

Letters

Tea and tributaries • HONG KONG AND SINGAPORE

Nukes of hazard • America’s ICBMS are ageing. Does it still need them?

It contains multitudes • America struggles to comprehend the scale of its loss

Go big or go home • CHICAGO

To smooth a cliff • Smuggled into the covid-relief bill is an overdue fix for Obamacare

Stop writing • BOSTON

Snow business • DALLAS

Teach first • America’s failure to get millions of its children back to school is a national fiasco

Hoping against hope • The country needs a new leader. It is not clear when it will get one

Reggaeton rebellion • A music video rattles the regime

Victory for the old politics • The winding up of Brazil’s anti-corruption task-force marks the end of an era

Life in the doghouse • HONG KONG, SEOUL AND SYDNEY

Breaking cover • SINGAPORE

Get me a flat—or else • SEOUL

Toolmasters • The Indian government’s pursuit of its critics is not just unfair, but hypocritical

Time for some holistic love • HONG KONG

Reviled to revered • BEIJING

Build it and they will go • China’s high-speed trains enable long-distance commuting. Officials are not sure they approve

The gilded path to power • COTONOU, KAMPALA AND MAIKUU

Murder in the mountains • ADDIS ABABA

Abu Yair wants your support • JERUSALEM

The odd couple • ISTANBUL AND MOSCOW

Uphill struggle in the snow • SAINT-MARTIN-DE-BELLEVILLE

Secret snips • BERLIN

Underground abortions • After a ban in Poland, Polish women buy train tickets

How life sciences came to the rescue • A powerful research base combined with good decision-making to save lives

Pencil it in • The government learns to manage expectations

An impossible job • The prime minister’s lot is not a happy one

Kitchen-table classrooms • Covid-19 has persuaded some parents that home-schooling is better

Collusion and collisions • The new rules of competition in the technology industry

Loss of Sneadership

Continental drift • HONG KONG AND PARIS

Foot-in-mouth disease • How to avoid corporate embarrassment

Headsets at dawn • Apple’s duel with Facebook exemplifies a new form of big-power rivalry

Coming into its own • The price of carbon in the world’s biggest, most liquid market is soaring. Investors are starting to pay attention 

Cleaning up • HONG KONG AND SHANGHAI

Petrol problems  • SÃO PAULO

UnTethered • A stablecoin is branded anything but, adding to jitters in crypto-markets

Jumping the skew • A feted fund manager and the search for the big business winners of the future

Not having it all • WASHINGTON, DC

Giving up carbs • What are cheap ways to cut carbon? Bill Gates is the latest to ask the...


Expand title description text