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The Economist

Jan 30 2021
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

Coronavirus briefs • To 6am GMT January 28th 2021

The world this week

Who will go nuclear next? • The world is facing an upsurge of proliferation. To stop it, nuclear powers need to act

Shot in the foot • Fussy decision-making has slowed Europe’s vaccine roll-out—and threatens its economy

The folly of Buy American • President Biden’s protectionism sullies his economic agenda

Time for Abbas to go • New leadership is needed both in the West Bank and in Gaza

Free not to choose • In its rivalry with China, America should not force Asians to pick sides

Letters

Who’s next? • Nuclear proliferation is not fast. But it is still frightening

Ctrl+Z • WASHINGTON, DC

Access denied • BOSTON

The new, old thing • DALLAS

Getting away with it • WASHINGTON, DC

Prisoners’ dilemma • WASHINGTON, DC

Lifts-off • EUGENE, OREGON

QAnon and other delusions • Republicans face a choice between Donald Trump and reality

A worrying windfall • EWEGONO, ECUADOR

Bootleg bonanza • MEDELLÍN

Relief tinged with scepticism • HONG KONG

Snowflake surrender • BEIJING

Suga slumps • TOKYO

Ice lord • The elusive boss of Asia’s biggest drug-trafficking gang is arrested

Hard to account for • India’s budgets are becoming ever less reformist

Precariat unite! • HONG KONG

School’s out • The pandemic disrupts China’s rise as a destination for foreign scholars

Becoming more Chinese • Assimilation of minorities is not just for Uyghurs and Tibetans

To the polls • DUBAI AND JERUSALEM

Sex, lies and videotape • The regime is peeping on its critics in an effort to silence them

Feast and famine • MONZE

A tale of two billionaires • One gets prison, the other a reprieve from sanctions

Shots fired • PARIS

Pasteur’s lament • POISSY

Going, going… • ROME

Wheezing • BERLIN

A cult leader gets 1,000 years in jail • ISTANBUL

Eastern Europe’s brain gain • How the pandemic has reversed old migration patterns

Searching for the exit • Most Britons think Scotland is heading for independence. Most Scots want it. But they lack the means to get it

Learning the drill • UK drill music is taking London slang around the world

Party of colour • The world’s oldest political party has done a good job of embracing ethnic diversity

Last of the daredevils • CHAMONIX

Mittelstand-off • BERLIN

Stockholm syndrome • BERLIN

Big tech down under • Could Google quit Australia?

Big tech’s banner year

Abrahamic profits • DUBAI AND JERUSALEM

Espresso lane • WASHINGTON, DC

Will baby drill? • NEW YORK

Hail to the “chiefs” • An epidemic of new corporate roles

You’ll often walk alone • Loneliness is a widespread problem with complex roots

The state bird of Washington, DC • Can Boeing fly without government help?

The great escape • JIANGMEN

Acting less big • HONG KONG

Building block • WASHINGTON, DC

Will the GameStop? • NEW YORK

Time warp • Markets are frothy—but beware the siren call of market timing

Can cannot be kicked further • Will the dire state of India’s public-sector banks force the government to act?

The...


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OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

Coronavirus briefs • To 6am GMT January 28th 2021

The world this week

Who will go nuclear next? • The world is facing an upsurge of proliferation. To stop it, nuclear powers need to act

Shot in the foot • Fussy decision-making has slowed Europe’s vaccine roll-out—and threatens its economy

The folly of Buy American • President Biden’s protectionism sullies his economic agenda

Time for Abbas to go • New leadership is needed both in the West Bank and in Gaza

Free not to choose • In its rivalry with China, America should not force Asians to pick sides

Letters

Who’s next? • Nuclear proliferation is not fast. But it is still frightening

Ctrl+Z • WASHINGTON, DC

Access denied • BOSTON

The new, old thing • DALLAS

Getting away with it • WASHINGTON, DC

Prisoners’ dilemma • WASHINGTON, DC

Lifts-off • EUGENE, OREGON

QAnon and other delusions • Republicans face a choice between Donald Trump and reality

A worrying windfall • EWEGONO, ECUADOR

Bootleg bonanza • MEDELLÍN

Relief tinged with scepticism • HONG KONG

Snowflake surrender • BEIJING

Suga slumps • TOKYO

Ice lord • The elusive boss of Asia’s biggest drug-trafficking gang is arrested

Hard to account for • India’s budgets are becoming ever less reformist

Precariat unite! • HONG KONG

School’s out • The pandemic disrupts China’s rise as a destination for foreign scholars

Becoming more Chinese • Assimilation of minorities is not just for Uyghurs and Tibetans

To the polls • DUBAI AND JERUSALEM

Sex, lies and videotape • The regime is peeping on its critics in an effort to silence them

Feast and famine • MONZE

A tale of two billionaires • One gets prison, the other a reprieve from sanctions

Shots fired • PARIS

Pasteur’s lament • POISSY

Going, going… • ROME

Wheezing • BERLIN

A cult leader gets 1,000 years in jail • ISTANBUL

Eastern Europe’s brain gain • How the pandemic has reversed old migration patterns

Searching for the exit • Most Britons think Scotland is heading for independence. Most Scots want it. But they lack the means to get it

Learning the drill • UK drill music is taking London slang around the world

Party of colour • The world’s oldest political party has done a good job of embracing ethnic diversity

Last of the daredevils • CHAMONIX

Mittelstand-off • BERLIN

Stockholm syndrome • BERLIN

Big tech down under • Could Google quit Australia?

Big tech’s banner year

Abrahamic profits • DUBAI AND JERUSALEM

Espresso lane • WASHINGTON, DC

Will baby drill? • NEW YORK

Hail to the “chiefs” • An epidemic of new corporate roles

You’ll often walk alone • Loneliness is a widespread problem with complex roots

The state bird of Washington, DC • Can Boeing fly without government help?

The great escape • JIANGMEN

Acting less big • HONG KONG

Building block • WASHINGTON, DC

Will the GameStop? • NEW YORK

Time warp • Markets are frothy—but beware the siren call of market timing

Can cannot be kicked further • Will the dire state of India’s public-sector banks force the government to act?

The...


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